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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
, extremist, very intolerant prejudices that were taking place among the various religions of the world, she said, i grew up in an environment which was christian, which people followed their christian religion. others followed their muslim religion and others their african superstitions. and for me, this went to the heart of why the book became inevitable, or why i have been engaged in this discourse all my life. very strange. i find it very -- pretty close to 80, i should actually exist in an environment in which, for believing what i believe, or not believing what i do not believe, i'd be considered what i call terminal censorship. and go back to my history, and i don't mean me personally. the time when i lived and was raised. the history of my people. when the european explorers, of course, quickly followed by their religious storm troopers, the christian missionaries. they had a very serious problem and that was they couldn't find satan. they couldn't find the devil. if you want to convert people, you've got to first of all persuade them their soul is in dire danger. headed to the ult
:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. columnist in a news analyst talks about the relationship with religion and american politics. he was introduced by the former missouri senator and ambassador to the united nations and john danforth. from washington university, this is an hour-and-a-half. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special co
of religion in a second republic, in a postrevolutionary egyptian state. and there were some new elements introduced that hadn't existed in previous constitutions. there was a larger role carved out for religion with a number of articles in the constitution. that had been controversial, not so much for what they did but insomuch as i think more than as much as they were in what they allowed for. so you had, for example, article 2 is the standard iteration of the role of sharia -- the principles of sharia in defining legislation, but you also had article 4, which allowed for a role of the al-azhar university for the first time, which is an unelected body, a religious body that issues religions opinions. and so this role was very vague, but it was enshrined in the constitution. you also had probably the most controversial is article 219, which attempted to define what principles of sharia actually meant, and in doing so i think the wording, of course, is very vague and i would say it doesn't open -- it doesn't create a religious state, but it opens the door to a religious state that could b
i fell out of love. that's your choice. >> he talks religion, reason, and what america needs now. >> the good life isn't good enough. what you need is the better life. >> the election, the economy, same-sex marriage and more, to the issues that really matter. >> you know why we have to change the constitution? it was a flawed document. it was made by men. >> what does god mean to you? this is "piers morgan tonight." >> good evening, and happy holidays and welcome to a special "piers morgan tonight." joining me, one of the most influential spiritual leaders in the world, rick warren. we're going to talk about politics, sins, and much, much more. he's the author of "a purpose driven life." >> it's good to be here with you. >> what is the purpose of christmas? >> you know, the angels in the story the first christmas said three things. those three statements say the three purposes of christmas. they are celebration, salvation, and reconciliation. first thing the angels said was, i bring you good news of great joy. which shall be for all people. by the way, christmas isn't just for ch
to the abolitionists, and so their attitude was you want us to study your language and religion, we'll do it, but at the same time, we're going to invest on our own io deppedty as the mendi people. you could say that their african identity grew as a counterpoint to the idea that they should be civilized pie yous christians. now, all of these tensions were on displace because once the supreme court ruled in their favor and said they could go home, well, the supreme court said they had to have speedometer to pay for the going home, how were they going to get home? well, for the longest time, people believed louis and other wealthy abolitionists paid for this, but, in fact, what happened, the abolitionists with the cooperation of the africans organized a big tour up and down the eastern sea board in which the africans would go and speak and perform their knowledge of christianity, perform their knowledge of english, perform their civilization, and, at the same time, insisted on singing their native african songs, the african side was always there, and here's the wildest part of it all -- the ma
of culture, race or religion or tribe there is some commonality. these are essential human truths and passions and truth and moral precepts. >> guest: in some ways that is a variation of what he said in a speech that made him famous in 2004 keynote address at the democratic national convention in boston where he said there are no red states or. states that the united states. that prevented himself as the personification of that notion. his presidency has been a rude awakening in terms of how far he could take that. he has been dealing with the promise and frustrations of that idea ever since as i am sure we will both be experiencing when the telephone calls come for the show. >> host: your book ends in 1989, "barack obama: the story". you say there's another volume coming. >> guest: 40 years of robert caro who is one of my heroes, check that out on the down load. i have every intention -- i have a lot of reporting which influenced this first book even though they are not in it. i don't want to do quickie, i don't want my books -- i write them for history. there are a lot of docume
politics and religion. >> both the house and the senate will return tomorrow. the senate is in a 10:00 a.m. eastern to work on two bills, one to extend provisions of the foreign intelligence service act and another is a relief package for areas affected by hurricanes can be. a vote is planned for 5:30 p.m. eastern on a least one of those measures. and the house returns at 2:00 p.m. eastern. their agenda depends on the status of the fiscal cliff negotiations. debate is possible in both chambers on any possible deal. live coverage at the house here on c-span and the senate on c- span 2. >> now a look at the war in syria and the potential for ssad regime.the a joined by former state department analyst, this is just over an hour. >> thank you, everybody, for coming this afternoon for a very timely discussion. on behalf of our chairman of the board, i want to welcome everybody to the center for national policy. i am the senior fellow for the middle list -- for the middle east here at cnp. we will discuss what is in store for the post-assad syria. mark twain once said that news of my death has
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)